Must have book: Host Resources Deep Dive by Frank Denneman, Niels Hagoort

The time has finally come that we published our book; VMware vSphere 6.5 Host Resources Deep Dive.

Countless hours, weeks, months has gone into this project. It all began in the beginning of 2016. Frank and I (Niels) had a lot of discussions about consistent performance and how to optimize while keeping consolidation ratios in mind. At the time, I was working on a NFV platform that was plotted on a virtual datacenter and Frank was working on his epic NUMA content. It all led to the idea of writing down our findings in a book.

It is almost like going against the current; we were looking into ESXi host behaviour, while the world is advancing to higher services running on top of vSphere. Why even bother about the hypervisor? It is all commodity after all, right? Well… not per se. It is all about understanding what you are doing on each level, not about just throwing hardware at a performance/capacity requirement. We began to talk about our ideas to our peers to see if they were interesting and feasible to include in a book.

We quickly came to the conclusion that there are a lot of unknowns when it comes to tuning your virtual environment to accompany distributed services like vSAN and NSX, latency sensitive workloads and right-sizing your VMs in general. We hope our book will help vSphere administrators, architects, consultants, aspiring VCDX-es and people eager to learn more about the elements that control the behavior of CPU, memory, storage and network resources.

I am extremely grateful that I was part of realising this book. It is really inspiring to work closely with Frank. He has a tremendous way of expressing his train of thought and has a lot of experience in creating tech books. Our discussions about tech or general topics are always a blast.

All our effort led to our (and my first) publishing which contains:

  • 122.543 words
  • 5217 paragraphs
  • 23 chapters
  • 569 pages
  • 311 screenshots and diagrams

The main challenge was to dig deep in the world of host resources while working a very busy day job at my beloved customers. The effort required was immense. Think a VCDX path times 10. At least, that is how it felt to me. But it was so much fun. I remember a few weeks ago; We were working on the last storage content until deep into the night, like we did almost every day for the last few months, and we were still so psyched at 3.30AM. So even after a very intense period, we still got the kicks out of talking about the content and book in the middle of the night!

The book is available via Amazon using the following link

The VMware vSphere 6.5 Host Resources Deep Dive is a guide to building consistent high-performing ESXi hosts. A book that people can’t put down. Written for administrators, architects, consultants, aspiring VCDX-es and people eager to learn more about the elements that control the behavior of CPU, memory, storage and network resources.

This book shows that we can fundamentally and materially improve the systems we’re building. We can make the currently running ones consistently faster by deeply understanding and optimizing our systems.

The reality is that specifics of the infrastructure matter. Details matter. Especially for distributed platforms which abstract resource layers, such as NSX and vSAN. Knowing your systems inside and out is the only way to be sure you’ve properly handled those details. It’s about having a passion for these details. It’s about loving the systems we build. It’s about understanding them end-to-end.

This book explains the concepts and mechanisms behind the physical resource components and the VMkernel resource schedulers, which enables you to:

  • Optimize your workload for current and future Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) systems.
  • Discover how vSphere Balanced Power Management takes advantage of the CPU Turbo Boost functionality, and why High Performance does not.
  • How the 3-DIMMs per Channel configuration results in a 10-20% performance drop.
  • How TLB works and why it is bad to disable large pages in virtualized environments.
  • Why 3D XPoint is perfect for the vSAN caching tier.
  • What queues are and where they live inside the end-to-end storage data paths.
  • Tune VMkernel components to optimize performance for VXLAN network traffic and NFV environments.
  • Why Intel’s Data Plane Development Kit significantly boosts packet processing performance.

Blog from: Cloudfix.nl / FrankDenneman.nl

(Frank is Technical Advisor at EVO Venture Partners)